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  • Dale Brown: Revolution (Dale Brown's Dreamland)

    Dale Brown: Revolution (Dale Brown's Dreamland)
    Dreamland lives! General "Earthmover" Samson joins Col. "Dog" Bastion and the rest of the Dreamland team to keep the world safe. Good stuff to read on the plane. (***)

  • Thomas L. Friedman: Hot, Flat, and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution--and How It Can Renew America

    Thomas L. Friedman: Hot, Flat, and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution--and How It Can Renew America
    The most important thing you are going to read this year. How America finding its way can lead the world in solving the critical problems facing us all. (*****)

  • Nelson DeMille: The Gold Coast

    Nelson DeMille: The Gold Coast
    I never read anything be DeMille before. I needed to read something on a plane trip and it was about Long Island. What have I been missing all of these years! A great book. Not really heavy but great mental floss. I can't wait to read the sequel. (*****)

  • Jack Whyte: Standard of Honor (A Templar Novel)

    Jack Whyte: Standard of Honor (A Templar Novel)
    The master of the Templar novels. Whyte transports you back to Crusades. The factions, the characters and the plots keep you locked in from the first page to the last. (****)

  • Harry Turtledove: Settling Accounts    In at the Death (Settling Accounts)

    Harry Turtledove: Settling Accounts In at the Death (Settling Accounts)
    This is the final saga in this master alternate history. It is WWII all over again except the US is fighting the Confederate states, while England and France fight Germany , a US ally. All of the parties are racing to create an atomic bomb. The one who makes it first could rule the world. Great alternate history by the master of this genre! (****)

  • Kevin J. Anderson: Metal Swarm (The Saga of Seven Suns)

    Kevin J. Anderson: Metal Swarm (The Saga of Seven Suns)
    Has it been 7 years since this series started? Anderson has created a deep rich universe that rivals some of the greatest ever done in SciFi. There is one more book left for this series, though word is Anderson may revisit the universe in the future. This episode brings the surviving characters on a collision course that will determine the future of the universe. On its own, its a fair book, but as another step in the series it continues the story along nicely! (***)

  • David Gibbins: Crusader Gold

    David Gibbins: Crusader Gold
    A Dan Brown like plot, I didn't realize this was a sequel to an earlier book, Atlantis. I don't think this is anywhere near as Brown's but it is good reading for the plane. (***)

  • Orson Scott Card: Invasive Procedures

    Orson Scott Card: Invasive Procedures
    A medical mystery involving gene therapy and run away virus. So far it looks much better than the Crichton's Next. This is actually based on a short story by Card from a while back and then a screenplay written based on it. Good reading! (****)

  • Todd J. Mccaffrey: Dragonsblood (Pern)

    Todd J. Mccaffrey: Dragonsblood (Pern)
    After reading some of the heavy stuff I have recently, I picked up some brain floss. Returning to Pern and the world of dragons. This is by Anne's son Todd. It was good to get back into the Pern world, but this was not one of the best in the series. (**)

  • James Carroll: Constantine's Sword: The Church and the Jews -- A History

    James Carroll: Constantine's Sword: The Church and the Jews -- A History
    Looks like a book I will learn a lot from. It is long, but than again it covers two thousand years. Will be interesting to see what I say when I finish. (****)

  • Conn Iggulden: Genghis: Birth of an Empire

    Conn Iggulden: Genghis: Birth of an Empire
    I have always been drawn to stories of Genghis Khan. How was he able to take a primitive people and conquer most of the world? What did the Mongol culture have that enabled this. This is the first of a trilogy on the life of the great Khan. It is great, easy reading and gives a great picture into the life and times of GK. (****)

  • Wilbur Smith: The Quest

    Wilbur Smith: The Quest
    Smith has an amazing ability to transport you back to ancient Eygpt. I have read several of his novels about Eygpt and am always totally absorbed from the very first pages to the end. (****)

  • Jeff Shaara: The Rising Tide: A Novel of World War II

    Jeff Shaara: The Rising Tide: A Novel of World War II
    Great historical novel about WWII. North Africa and Sicily campaigns come alive. You feel like you really are getting to know Ike, Patton, Rommel and the rest. (****)

  • Dale Brown: Strike Force: A Novel

    Dale Brown: Strike Force: A Novel
    Another great book by Dale Brown. Iran is getting help from Russia and the Iranian monarchy is trying to overthrow the theocracy. Dreamland's super weapons to the rescue! (****)

  • Christopher Moore: Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal

    Christopher Moore: Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal
    The Gospel according to Jesus's childhood pal, Biff. Need I say more. Actually pretty funny stuff. (***)

  • David Weber: Off Armageddon Reef

    David Weber: Off Armageddon Reef
    Aliens have destroyed humanity. A small isolated colony has been hidden to grow into a new human empire, but they are robbed of the knowledge of their inheritance. A religion based on keeping the people in the dark about their legacy controls the world. Great reading, good fantasy (****)

  • Michael Chabon: The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay

    Michael Chabon: The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay
    Brad Feld gave me this book. It is a Pulitzer Prize winner from the author of the Yiddish Policemens Union. This book is even better. Funny, yet biting it brings the horror and excitement of WWII to life through the eyes of a jewish refugee from Prauge and his cousin from Brooklyn. All about the comic book industry and real life tragedies and love. Worthy of all the praise and awards! (*****)

  • W. Michael Gear: People of the Nightland (First North Americans)

    W. Michael Gear: People of the Nightland (First North Americans)
    I have read almost every book in this series of paleo Indians by this husband/wife team. I don't know what it is, but I love hearing these stories based upon Native American legends and myths. (***)

  • David Michaels: Tom Clancy's EndWar (Tom Clancy's Endwar)

    David Michaels: Tom Clancy's EndWar (Tom Clancy's Endwar)
    A new series inspired by Tom Clancy and based on a game. It is WW III, Saudi Arabia and Iran have exchanged nukes and the Russians are fighting the US and Euros. Not up to Clancy himself standards, but a good airplane read. (***)

  • John Grisham: The Appeal

    John Grisham: The Appeal
    A new legal thriller from Grisham. Does anyone do these better? It started right up from the get go and holds the reader captive. Without giving away the ending, Grisham brings the end of this book home to today's political climate. (****)

  • Gary Jennings: Aztec Rage (Aztec)

    Gary Jennings: Aztec Rage (Aztec)
    A continuation to the series started by the late Jennings. Not quite as brilliant as the first novel, but it is fairly faithful to Jennings style and continues the history of the Aztec/Spanish mix that becomes Mexico. (***)

  • Stephen Baxter: Navigator: Time's Tapestry, Book Three (Time's Tapestry)

    Stephen Baxter: Navigator: Time's Tapestry, Book Three (Time's Tapestry)
    The 3rd in this alternate history series by Baxter. I am still waiting to see what is alternate about this history. Alternate or not though, Baxter is a master storyteller and it is a pleasure to read. (****)

  • Harry Turtledove: Opening Atlantis

    Harry Turtledove: Opening Atlantis
    The first in a new trilogy by the master of alternate history. In this series there is an 8th continent between Europe and America called Atlantis. How it effects the unfolding of world history will be the subject of the series. So far it is pretty interesting. (***)

  • John Grisham: The Innocent Man: Murder and Injustice in a Small Town

    John Grisham: The Innocent Man: Murder and Injustice in a Small Town
    This is a non-fiction book but reads like lots of Grisham's legal thrillers. After reading this book it is hard to think that the death penalty can be enforced in this country without innocent men being executed. It also makes you think Oklahoma is just not a great place to be living in. (***)

  • David Michaels: Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Fallout (Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell)

    David Michaels: Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Fallout (Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell)
    I really like this series and its hero Sam Fisher. Based on a video game the author has done a great job making Sam Fisher a real person. In this one Sam is chasing his brothers killers who are involved in nuclear terrorism in the former USSR.

  • Michael Crichton: Next (Harper Fiction)

    Michael Crichton: Next (Harper Fiction)
    Everything comes together a little too coincidentally, but it shows us what can happen with gene science gone mad. (**)

  • Raymond Khoury: The Sanctuary

    Raymond Khoury: The Sanctuary
    I liked his Templar book so thought I would give this one a try. Set in 1700's Europe and modern day Iraq and Lebanon, it is a good thriller. (***)

  • Stephen Baxter: Conqueror: Time's Tapestry Book Two (Time's Tapestry)

    Stephen Baxter: Conqueror: Time's Tapestry Book Two (Time's Tapestry)
    Book 2 in the time tapestry series, it is a great historical novel of post-Roman Britain. I am just not sure what the alternative history is here. It seems pretty much as I remember learning it. (***)

  • John Grisham: Playing For Pizza: A Novel

    John Grisham: Playing For Pizza: A Novel
    Another one of Grisham's easy reading non-legal thriller kind of books. A disgraced NFL quarterback goes to play for pizza in Italy. (***)

  • Harry Turtledove: The Grapple (Settling Accounts, Book 3)

    Harry Turtledove: The Grapple (Settling Accounts, Book 3)
    Somehow I am on book 3 of this series. I read book 1 and 2, but did not write up the review of 2. Anyway, in book 3 the tide turns against the CSA and for USA. Great alternate history of WW II (***)

  • Bill Bryson: The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir

    Bill Bryson: The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir
    I was looking for something light on a trip back home. Though I am a bit young (beleive it or not) for a lot of this and did not grow up in the Mid-West there are some things about growing up that are universal. Very funny book! (****)

  • Dale Brown: Dale Brown's Dreamland: Retribution (Dreamland (Harper Paperback))

    Dale Brown: Dale Brown's Dreamland: Retribution (Dreamland (Harper Paperback))
    One of the better ones so far in this series. Lots of cool weapons and sinister bad guys. (***)

  • Thomas L. Friedman: The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century

    Thomas L. Friedman: The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century
    Finally it comes to paperback and a new updated edition at that! For some reason I never read this bible of our brave new world. So much of it now seems obvious, but there is still much to learn here. (****)

  • Brian Herbert & Kevin Anderson: Sandworms of Dune

    Brian Herbert & Kevin Anderson: Sandworms of Dune
    Finally! All of your questions around Dune are answered. The fate of the Universe and the Tyrant's Golden Path is revealed. Every Dune fan should read this one to tie up the loose ends. Also reading Herbert and Anderson's prequels to the original series will help. (*****)

  • Jack Whyte: Knights of the Black and White

    Jack Whyte: Knights of the Black and White
    I don't know what it is with Templars, but I am facisinated by the story. This is a good one and looks like the start of a series. I reccomend it! (****)

  • Patrick M. Lencioni: The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable

    Patrick M. Lencioni: The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable
    Got this book from Mitchell. It is a quick read and offers some excellent insight into how a real team can function allowing for the free flow of information and exchange of ideas in a healthy and productive way. Great read for anyone part of an executive team. (****)

  • Harry Turtledove: Return Engagement (Settling Accounts Trilogy, Book 1)

    Harry Turtledove: Return Engagement (Settling Accounts Trilogy, Book 1)
    The start of WW II in the alternate history series by Turtledove. The CSA gets off to a quick start against the USA. (***)

  • Michael Chabon: The Yiddish Policemen's Union: A Novel

    Michael Chabon: The Yiddish Policemen's Union: A Novel
    Full of Yiddish sayings, in this alternate history of post-WWII Jews is both funny and sad. A good read wrapped in a detective story who done it. (***)

  • Dale Brown: Edge of Battle

    Dale Brown: Edge of Battle
    Dale Brown does better when doing battle with other superpowers, not drug smugglers, terrorists and tackling topics immigration reform. I love his action and technology, but didn't like the subject matter. (**)

  • Kevin J. Anderson: Of Fire and Night (The Saga of Seven Suns, Book 5)

    Kevin J. Anderson: Of Fire and Night (The Saga of Seven Suns, Book 5)
    This one clears up a lot of the plot lines from the first four books in a neat bow. However, just when you think the end is near, a new twist comes along that has you waiting for the next book. A big time scifi epic! (****)

  • Kevin Phillips: American Theocracy: The Peril and Politics of Radical Religion, Oil, and Borrowed Money in the 21stCentury

    Kevin Phillips: American Theocracy: The Peril and Politics of Radical Religion, Oil, and Borrowed Money in the 21stCentury
    This can be dry and slow reading, but will open your eyes to what is really going on here. Phillips, a former Republican strategist, lays out a strong case on how oil, religious wars and debt are driving America away from world leadership. (****)

  • Raymond Khoury: The Last Templar

    Raymond Khoury: The Last Templar
    Another book on the long lost secret of the Templars, which can bring the Church to its needs. It was a good thriller. All of these DaVinci Code spawn are starting to run together in my mind. (***)

  • Harry Turtledove: American Empire: The Victorious Opposition (American Empire)

    Harry Turtledove: American Empire: The Victorious Opposition (American Empire)
    Turteldove is the master of alternate history. Many other SF writers are trying this genre, including Card and Baxter. In this one, the Confederate States of America takes on the role of the Nazi's in pre-WWII. Good read. (***)

  • Steve Berry: The Templar Legacy: A Novel

    Steve Berry: The Templar Legacy: A Novel
    A DaVinci Code type of novel, with the recent press and controversy around the tomb of Jesus being discovered, this one became more real from it. A good read. (****)

  • Steve Berry: The Third Secret: A Novel of Suspense

    Steve Berry: The Third Secret: A Novel of Suspense
    A love story of a priest, a pope and the woman they loved. Wrapped around a quest for the missing 3rd secret of Fatima and an anti-christ potential new pope. Good story (***)

  • Tobsha Learner: The Witch of Cologne

    Tobsha Learner: The Witch of Cologne
    A little slow moving at first, it picks up steam mid way through. A tale of the end of the inquisition and the begining of modern Europe. This is the backdrop of a forbidden love between a Kabalah trained midwife and her inquisitor priest. It did get you into the plot. (****)

  • Mark Winegardner: The Godfather's Revenge

    Mark Winegardner: The Godfather's Revenge
    Another follow on authorized by Mario Puzo's estate. This fills in the time between Godfather, Part 2 and Part 3. With the characters from the original, it can't help but be good. (***)

  • Orson Scott Card: Empire

    Orson Scott Card: Empire
    Its the red versus blue states, urban versus rural, neo-cons versus the far left, in this American Civil War II. A little far fetched, the treachery though kept you guessing who and what was really behind it. (****)

  • James Patterson: Honeymoon

    James Patterson: Honeymoon
    My first Patterson book. I don't usually go in for this type of thriller, but I was getting on the plane in 5 minutes and had to have something to read. I finished it in just a few hours, it was pretty good. (***)

  • Stephen Baxter: Transcendent (Destiny's Children (Paperback))

    Stephen Baxter: Transcendent (Destiny's Children (Paperback))
    The third in the hive series by Baxter. It has his usual long historical sweep between the near and far future. Good harc core sci fi. (****)

  • David Michaels: Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Checkmate (Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell)

    David Michaels: Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Checkmate (Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell)
    This series based on a PC game (corny isn't it) has actually turned into one of the better Clancy series out there. It is number 3 in the series and was pretty good. (***)

  • Dale Brown: Dale Brown's Dreamland: End Game (Dreamland (Harper Paperback))

    Dale Brown: Dale Brown's Dreamland: End Game (Dreamland (Harper Paperback))
    Another in the Dreamland series by Dale Brown. It started off a bit slow, but revved up to the usual Brown level of thriller. (***)

  • Eric Flint: 1812: The Rivers of War

    Eric Flint: 1812: The Rivers of War
    A good alternative history of the War of 1812 and the role of the Native Americans. The alternative prospective is allowing the Cherokee's a planned retreat West and sparing them the Trail of Tears. (***)

  • Harry Turtledove: End of the Beginning: A Novel of Alternate History

    Harry Turtledove: End of the Beginning: A Novel of Alternate History
    The great sequel to an alternative history where the attack is Pearl Harbor is followed by an invasion and conquest of the islands. No we take them back with a vengence. (****)

  • Mitch Albom: For One More Day

    Mitch Albom: For One More Day
    Like all his books, this one will make you laugh a little, cry a little and think a lot. This particular story was a bit close to home for me. It is a quick read. (*****)

  • Eliyahu M. Goldratt: The Goal

    Eliyahu M. Goldratt: The Goal
    A great book to make you think about managing a business in a new way. I highly recomend it to anyone interested in how to measure and effect efficient production (****)

  • Brian Herbert: The Road to Dune

    Brian Herbert: The Road to Dune
    Sort of like viewing the bonus features on a DVD, only the most hard core Dune fan is going to appreciate this. Stuff that wasn't good enough for the originals put together here. (**)

  • Brian Herbert: Hunters of Dune (The Dune Series)

    Brian Herbert: Hunters of Dune (The Dune Series)
    OK the son is not the father (talking about the authors, not the characters), but this is based on his outlines and haven't you always wondered who the outside enemy was. This is chapter 7 of Dune and if you read the others, you have to read this. (****)

  • Harry Turtledove: Days of Infamy

    Harry Turtledove: Days of Infamy
    I love Sci Fi and Historic novels. So I am drawn to alternate . This one involves the invasion of Hawaii after Pearl Harbor. Of course it will change the course of WW II, at least for a little while before the inevitible. (***)

  • Dan Simmons: Olympos

    Dan Simmons: Olympos
    Great conclusion to Ilium. This book ties up the the varied stories of both books into one story line. A vast sage, I think this may be his best yet! (****)

  • Jeffrey Anderson: Second Genesis

    Jeffrey Anderson: Second Genesis
    Great story on genetic manipulation, stem cells, medical ethics and just a great thriller. I really liked this book about genetically enhanced chimps. (****)

  • Chris Stewart: The Fourth War

    Chris Stewart: The Fourth War
    With everything going on in the Middle East, this one got a little to real. Pakastani nukes are up for grabs. The Israeli Shin Bet and US CIA try to get to them before an Al Queda type of organization can get there hands on them. Scary stuff! (****)

  • David McCullough: 1776

    David McCullough: 1776
    McCullough is a master of well researched history. This is just about the first year of the revolution and puts you in the middle of the pivotal events. (****)

  • Kevin J. Anderson: Scattered Suns (The Saga of Seven Suns, Book 4)

    Kevin J. Anderson: Scattered Suns (The Saga of Seven Suns, Book 4)
    After my last two books, it was time for something a little lighter. This is book 4 in a grand SciFi space saga. Lots of characters and plots, good reading. (****)

  • Karen Armstrong: A History of God: The 4,000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity and Islam

    Karen Armstrong: A History of God: The 4,000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity and Islam
    A great historical look at the evolution of our concepts and beliefs in God, primarily from the view of Judeo-Christian-Islam perspective. However, other philosophies and religous beliefs are discussed as well. It is very heavy on philosophy and mysticism. You need to think with this book. (****)

  • James Bradley: Flag of our Fathers

    James Bradley: Flag of our Fathers
    A detailed personal look at the 6 Marines in the famous Iwo Jima flag photo, written by the son of one of them. The loving attention to these American heros is well deserved. (****)

  • Arthur C. Clarke & Stephen Baxter: Sunstorm (A Time Odyssey)

    Arthur C. Clarke & Stephen Baxter: Sunstorm (A Time Odyssey)
    A sequel to their first book together, A Time's Eye, this is hardcore SF at its best. The story revolves around the inner workings of the sun and the catastrophic results to Earth and humanity if any minor deviation of the Sun's energy output were to take place (***)

  • Edward Rutherfurd: The Rebels of Ireland : The Dublin Saga

    Edward Rutherfurd: The Rebels of Ireland : The Dublin Saga
    Another great book by the master of historic novels. He may even be better than Michener. This is the sequel to The Princes of Ireland and is even better than the first. (*****)

  • Stephen Baxter: Exultant (Destiny's Children (Hardcover))

    Stephen Baxter: Exultant (Destiny's Children (Hardcover))
    A grand sweeping space saga of the type that Baxter is known for. This one covers from before the big bang to the early history of our universe and such hard science topics as dark energy and dark matter. Great book! (****)

  • Peter F. Hamilton: Judas Unchained

    Peter F. Hamilton: Judas Unchained
    The sequel to Pandora's Star, this book had almost too many sub-plots. It made it difficult to follow sometimes. The story that had so much promise in Pandora's Star, really seemed to just never get off the ground in this one. Not one of my favorite Hamilton books. He can be up and down like that. (**)

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  • Dan Brown: Digital Fortress : A Thriller

    Dan Brown: Digital Fortress : A Thriller
    For some reason I thought his other books were not going to be as good as Da Vinci and Angels & Demons. No religous theme here, but a good thriller with lots of twists to keep you on the edge. (****)

  • Steve  Perry: Tom Clancy's Net Force 10 : The Archimedes Effect (Net Force)

    Steve Perry: Tom Clancy's Net Force 10 : The Archimedes Effect (Net Force)
    This series used to be pretty good reading. Lately it is just not as good. It is OK to pass the time though. (**)

  • Troy Denning: The Swarm War (Star Wars: Dark Nest, Book 3)

    Troy Denning: The Swarm War (Star Wars: Dark Nest, Book 3)
    Set after the New Jedi Order series, good filler for trying across the country. (**)

  • Joseph J Ellis: His Excellency

    Joseph J Ellis: His Excellency
    Good biography on Washington, by one of the masters of revolutionary war history. (****)

  • Michael Crichton: State of Fear

    Michael Crichton: State of Fear
    Great book about the environmental movement. Chricton has another thriller, but this will make you think about your views on global warming, the media and other environmenta issues (****)

  • David  Michaels: Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: OPERATION BARRACUDA

    David Michaels: Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: OPERATION BARRACUDA
    Based on a video game (yeah thats right), this series is actually pretty good. Makes for good airplane reading. (***)

  • John Grisham: The Broker

    John Grisham: The Broker
    I had low expectations but this book really hooked me. I was over 200 pages in before I took a breath. The end was sort of rushed, but enjoyed this book. He is a master storyteller. (****)

  • Billy Crystal: 700 Sundays

    Billy Crystal: 700 Sundays
    Based on his one man Broadway show. Billy examines his relationship with his Dad who died when he was 15. He spent about 700 Sundays with him. You will laugh a little and cry a little but I think you will like it. (****)

  • Bob Dylan: Chronicles : Volume One

    Bob Dylan: Chronicles : Volume One
    One cliche after another, you had to laugh after a while. A hodge podge of glimpes into his early and mid-career. The DVD is much better. (**)

  • Philip Roth: The Plot Against America: A Novel

    Philip Roth: The Plot Against America: A Novel
    A "what if" book. The premise is Lindbergh runs for president in 1940. He defeats Roosevelt, keeps us out of the war and institutes a anti-semtic, facsist administration. Scary! (***)

  • Ian Caldwell: The Rule of Four

    Ian Caldwell: The Rule of Four
    Not as good as the Dan Brown novels I think but an interesting puzzle book. Lots of Princeton stuff by two new young authors (***)

  • Dale Brown: Act of War : A Novel

    Dale Brown: Act of War : A Novel
    I have read all of Dale Brown's books starting with Flight of the Old Dog. If you like Clancy, you will love Dale Brown. (****)

  • Jeff  Rovin: Op-Center XII: War of Eagles (Tom Clancy's Op-Center)

    Jeff Rovin: Op-Center XII: War of Eagles (Tom Clancy's Op-Center)
    Uses Tom Clancy's name but by other authors. I read all of these series to fill time on planes. Not the greatest books you will ever read but they pass the time away (**)

  • Brad Meltzer: The Zero Game

    Brad Meltzer: The Zero Game
    My first book by Meltzer, it just seemed a little to simple for me. (**)

  • Stephen Baxter: Evolution

    Stephen Baxter: Evolution
    Great Sci Fi from one of the two new great authors of sci fi from the UK. Baxter and Hamilton pick up the baton from Clark and Asimov (****)

  • W. Michael Gear: People of the Raven

    W. Michael Gear: People of the Raven
    Another in the first American series. Here white people come to the Pacific Northwest thousands of years ago. (****)

  • Jimmy Carter: The Hornets Nest

    Jimmy Carter: The Hornets Nest
    It's hard I guess for an ex-president to really let loose. However, good historical novel of Georgia in American Revolutionary times. (***)

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Biography

Alan is a managing partner in The CISO Group, a provider of security, risk and compliance solutions. Prior to founding The CISO Group, Alan was the Chief strategy officer at SillSecure, a provider of network infrastructure security solutions. Alan has also held executive positions at Cachier, Interliant and was a founder of TriStar Web.

Alan is an often-cited personality in the security community and is a sought-after speaker at industry and government conferences and events. His commentary about the state of security is followed closely by many industry insiders via his blog and podcast, "Ashimmy, After All These Years" . Alan is now also a regular contributor to The CISO Group’s Security.exe blog and podcast.

Alan has helped build several successful technology companies by combining a strong business background with a deep knowledge of technology. His legal background, long experience in the field, and New York street smarts combine to form a unique personality.

Born and raised in Long Island, NY, I currently live in Boca Raton, Fl with my wife of 19 years Bonnie, our two boys, Landon, 9 and Bradley, 7 and our bulldog, Sandy.